Available courses

4 Credit Hours

Prerequisite: BIO 101 or Consent of Instructor

This course covers the theory of biological evolution. Topics include the origin, history, and classification of living organisms, genetic variation, genetic drift, natural selection adaptation, sexual selection, speciation, and the application of evolutionary principles to agriculture and human health. Macro- and micro-evolution will be discussed.

Prerequisite: None 

2 Credit Hours

BIO 104 covers basic medical vocabulary for those students with a minimal background in the healthcare field. At the end of this course, students will be able to: analyze any medical term as to its root, prefix, suffix, as well as its part of speech (noun, verb, adverb, adjective, etc.); demonstrate the ability to relate the medical term to the clinical situation; and effectively communicate with other healthcare members. 

Prerequisite: BIO 101 or Consent of Instructor 

5 Credit Hours: 4 lecture  + 1 lab 

This course is designed to focus on the comprehensive survey of modern biology with an emphasis on enhancing science literacy. Topics include cell biology, including structure and function; genetics; evolution; systematics; and physiological and scientific explanations of biological processes. Lectures and labs are designed to complement each other: Lectures introduce students to the principles of biological study and our current understanding of biology, while lab activities are designed to provide the exploration of the topics taught in the lecture via observation and experiments. 

Prerequisite: None

5 Credit Hours: 4 Lecture + 1 Lab

This course provides a basic understanding of the biological system. Emphasis is placed on cellular structure and function, classification, genetics, evolution, and more. Biological issues with personal and social implications are discussed to enable students to think critically and make informed decisions. Upon completion of this course, the student will have: learned about life at the molecular and cellular levels, applied the use of the scientific method for investigation of biological problems, learned how to collect and interpret data, gained competence in performing laboratory activities and its presentation with valid conclusions, and developed insight from exposure to scientific principles to make informed decisions concerning biological and other scientific issues with personal and social implications.

Prerequisite: DA 101, DA 103, or DA 105

93.5 Clock Hours; 2.48 Credit Hours

Topics in this course include microbiology, contagious diseases concerning the dental team, universal precautions, barrier techniques, and handling hazardous chemicals. Students learn operatory disinfection using approved agents and methods. They study cranial anatomy as it relates to anesthesia administration and pain control. Methods for taking and recording vital signs and blood pressure are introduced. Skills performed by the dental assistant in the specialty areas of oral surgery and endodontics (root canals) are presented, including procedures for the administration of topical and local anesthetics. 

Students practice acquired skills on Typodont manikins, placing instruments and materials. Career development instruction focuses on interview techniques, and related dental terminology is studied.

Prerequisite: None

2-3 Credit Hours

This course provides an overview of the role of various healthcare professions, ethical and legal responsibilities, patient assessment techniques, medical terminology, electronic health records, preventive health and wellness, cultural competence, communication and problem solving skills. Additional skills taught in this course include: vital signs assessment, safe body mechanics and safety, basic first aid, standard & transmission based infection precautions. 

Prerequisite: None

3 Credit Hours 

Through analyses of readings, films, and discussions/debates, this course attempts to discover by rational methods the truth about right and wrong, good and bad, as well as morality and immorality—otherwise referred to as the branch of philosophy known as ethics. Course content will critically examine existing systems of values and their applications to life situations and help improve students’ ability to understand and make ethical choices. 

3 Credit Hours

Prerequisite: ENG 101 or Consent of Instructor

Theory and practice of speech communication behavior in one-to-one, small group, and public communication situations are introduced. Students will improve their skills in communicating with others through the preparation and delivery of formal public speeches. This course requires college-level skills in reading and writing. Skills developed include understanding the writing/speaking processes from invention to presentation, the importance of audience, understanding and applying appropriate modes of expression, participating in groups with emphasis on listening, as well as using critical and reflective proficiency in the development of exposition and argument.  


Prerequisite: ENG 101 or Consent of Instructor

3 Credit Hours

This course concentrates on the proper understanding and use of the English language in various written genres. It reviews the steps of the writing process; continues the review of grammar and mechanics; requires textual analysis, written summaries, and narrative and persuasive writings both in and out of class; and introduces the basics of writing various types of argument essays. 

Prerequisite: None

3 Credit Hours

Academic Writing will incorporate the basic mechanics of English writing with copyright regulations. Students will explore various sources and work on clarifying topics, organizing arguments, and supporting claims with evidence and reasoning. In addition, students will practice summarizing, paraphrasing, and using citations while further developing editing skills. 

Prerequisite: MTH 121 or Consent of Instructor

4 Credit Hours

Statistics examines the following concepts: probability spaces, random variables and distribution, laws of large numbers, central limit theorem, joint probability distributions, sampling distributions, theory of estimation, and sample linear regression. 

The course theme may include biostatistics, which provides an introduction to selected important topics in biostatistical concepts and reasoning. Specific topics include tools for describing central tendency and  variability in data; methods for performing inference on population means and proportions via sample data; statistical hypothesis testing and its application to group comparisons; issues of power and sample size in study designs; and random sample and other study types. 

Prerequisite: MTH 121 or Consent of Instructor

4 Credit Hours

Calculus covers real numbers and basic properties. Emphasis is on the following concepts: algebraic operations involving integer exponents, including scientific notation, polynomial operations, and factoring polynomials; solutions of linear and quadratic equations as well as linear inequalities; solutions and manipulations of literal equations; and graphical and algebraic solutions of systems of linear equations in two variables. Emphases on geometry concepts include the following: perimeter; area of geometric figures, including triangles, rectangles, and circles; and volumes of spheres, cylinders, and pyramids. Applications of problem solving skills are emphasized throughout the course. Writing assignments are part of the course. 

Prerequisite: None

93.5 Clock Hours; 2.48 Credit Hours

This course introduces students to the concepts and skills involved in medical billing, banking, and insurance processing.  Anatomy and physiology with associated medical terminology of the digestive system are presented in conjunction with nutrition and health practices, is also discussed. Students study medical insurance, billing and coding, and bookkeeping procedures essential to the medical office. Students will continue to build upon their keyboarding and computing skills. Basic therapeutic drugs, their uses, classification and effects on the body are included. Students become familiar with the principles of administering medication. They prepare medication for administration by various methods.  

93.5 Clock Hours; 2.48 Credit Hours

Prerequisite: None

This course stresses the importance of asepsis and sterile technique in today’s health care environment. Students learn about basic bacteriology and its relationship to infection and disease control. Anatomy and physiology with associated medical terminology of the muscular system and common disorders related to it are taught. Basic therapeutic drugs, their uses, classification and effects on the body are included. Students become familiar with the principles of administering medication. They prepare medication for administration by various methods, and prepare for and assist with minor office surgical procedures. 

Prerequisite: None

24 Clock Hours

This 4-week course is designed to provide students with the pharmacy technician responsibilities of filling prescriptions, including the information required to fill prescriptions, typing prescription labels, and how to read a drug label. Hands-on skills are performed in a laboratory setting.  

24 Clock Hours

Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to introduce the student to professional aspects of working with pharmacy technology. Subjects covered include the history and changing roles of pharmacists and pharmacy technicians as well as the law and ethics of pharmacy, which includes the Food and Drug Act, the 1970 Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act, and other modern-day drug legislation. In addition, the course discusses the respiratory system and medications for respiratory tract disorders as well as oncology agents and HIV/AIDS. Calculations and dimensional analysis of drug dosages are also addressed, and hands-on skills are performed in the laboratory setting.  

5 Credit Hours: 3 lecture credits + 2 lab credits

Prerequisite: None


As an introductory course to chemistry, the following concepts are explored: scientific notation, metric system of measurement, the periodic table and its trends, atomic structure, molecular geometry, basic concepts of quantum theory, bonding, stoichiometry of compounds and reactions, nomenclature, and the relationships governing gaseous behavior. A basic research paper may be part of the course, as deemed necessary by the instructor. 

2 Credit Hours

Prerequisite: None


This course is designed as an introductory course for chemistry. Students will learn about the definition of chemicals, identify chemicals in the environment and their multiplication with the industrial revolution, and recognize harmful chemical exposure and the related health risks. Students will also learn about the different government and private agencies that identify chemicals, biomonitoring, and the measures taken to limit the harmful effects.  



Prerequisite: CHEM 101, CHEM 201, & MTH 122, or Consent of Instructor

 4 Credit Hours: 3 lecture + 1 lab 

This lecture and laboratory course is an introduction to the principles of analytical chemistry. It teaches practices followed in sampling, analyzing, separating substances, and quantitatively determining their yield. The analytical techniques taught in this course apply and build on the knowledge of the various concepts learned in general chemistry courses.


Prerequisite: CHEM 101 or Consent of Instructor 

5 Credit Hours: 4 lecture + 1 lab 

This course introduces the fundamentals of organic chemistry including structure, bonding, functional groups, resonance and stereochemistry. Students learn about the general properties, synthesis and reactions of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes and alkyl halide. Introduction to spectroscopic methods used in structural determination of organic molecules such as IR, NMR, UV and MS are also discussed. 

1-3 Credit Hours

Prerequisite: None

RES 210 emphasizes the importance of giving back to communities. The course outlines the activities and services that can be performed to benefit the communities. Students are required to submit a paper upon completion of their services. 

2 Credit Hours

Prerequisite: BIO 102 & CHEM 322 or Consent of Instructor


This course is designed to prepare students for the Medical College Admissions Test. Students will learn about the structure of the test, strategies and skills needed to perform well, and review of the scientific concepts addressed in the exam. 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory Completion or Concurrent Enrollment in RES 307/390 & Consent of Instructor at least 2 weeks before term start date

3-6 Credit Hours

This course is designed to give the students hands-on experience in carrying out research in different areas of science. Students are required to plan and conduct a research project and submit a paper based on the data derived from the conducted research and lab experimentation. 

Prerequisite: None 

3 Credit Hours

This introductory survey course covers the basic concepts across various institutions, such as marriage and family, education, religion, work, the media, and political and economic systems. It also addresses social identities, such as race, ethnicity, sex, gender, age, and health. Basic vocabulary of the discipline and research methods for social science are examined. A major research paper and various shorter assignments are required. 

Prerequisite: None

3 Credit Hours

This introductory survey course covers the basic concepts of the biological basis of behavior (especially the central and peripheral nervous systems), sense and perception, states of consciousness, learning, memory, motivation, emotions, personality development, psychological disorders, therapies, and social psychology. The basic vocabularies of the discipline as well as social science research methods are examined. A major paper and various topical assignments are required.